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1.  Can Appalachia Be Saved? Or Will ‘Worse and Worse’ Flooding Wash it Away?  

2022-08-07


Inside Climate News
View In: Kentucky Floods
JACKSON, Ky. — Teresa Watkins worked to salvage a few mud-caked belongings from her home on a Breathitt County branch of the Kentucky River after July 28 floods slammed her neighborhood for the second time in 17 months. The 54-year-old, who has lived off Quicksand Road since she was a teenager, sai...

2.  Strip Mining Worsened the Severity of Deadly Kentucky Floods, Say Former Mining Regulators. They Are Calling for an Investigation  

2022-08-07


Inside Climate News
View In: Kentucky Floods
Two former state and federal mining regulators say state and federal authorities should investigate the role strip mining played in last week’s devastating and deadly flooding in eastern Kentucky and the condition of the mines after the torrential rainfall. The Kentucky counties, and areas of West Virgini...

3.  Drought Emergency in Mexico Rekindles Demand for Water Law Reform  

2022-08-05


Inside Climate News
View In: Mexico
Norma Ortiz, 41, of Mexico’s Nuevo León State, has to make tough decisions about water. Does she use the little clean water her family has for bathing or laundry? Is it better to buy increasingly expensive food or overpriced bottled water to cook it? These are some of the many dilemmas she now face...

4.  Senate Democrats Produce a Far-Reaching Climate Bill, But the Price of Compromise with Joe Manchin is Years More Drilling for Oil and Gas  

2022-07-28


Inside Climate News
View In: Cemter For Disease Control CDC
To seal their surprise climate deal with Sen. Joe Manchin of West Virginia, Senate Democrats conceded that their only hope for advancing a plan for a clean energy future in Congress was to bind it up in a lifeline for fossil fuels. The legislation they propose to bring to the Senate next week still contain...

5.  How Is the Jet Stream Connected to Simultaneous Heat Waves Across the Globe?  

2022-07-27


Inside Climate News
View In: Global Heat and Drought
The deadly heat waves that have fueled blazes and caused transport disruptions in Europe, the U.S. and China this month have one thing in common: a peculiar shape in the jet stream dubbed “wavenumber 5.” Scientists are racing to understand whether the band of fast-moving air that controls weather i...

6.  Biden Administration Opens New Public Lands and Waters to Fossil Fuel Drilling, Disappointing Environmentalists  

2022-07-02


Inside Climate News
View In: Biden On Climate
This week, the Biden administration took two of its biggest steps yet to open public lands to fossil fuel development, holding its first onshore lease sales and releasing a proposed plan for offshore drilling that could open parts of the Gulf of Mexico and Alaska’s Cook Inlet to leasing through 2028...

7.  Every Hour, This Gas Storage Station Sends Half a Ton of Methane Into the Atmosphere  

2022-06-19


Inside Climate News
View In: Methane
PETAL, Miss.—The Petal Gas Storage Station lies halfway between the winding banks of the Leaf River and the International Checker Hall of Fame. It’s a warren of pipes, wellheads and metal buildings where noisy compressors pump gas underground and then suck it back up to the surface again.  In the process...

8.  In Africa, Conflict and Climate Super-Charge the Forces Behind Famine and Food Insecurity  

2022-06-12


Inside Climate News
View In: Food Prices in Africa
Jeffrey Maganya has spent the last three decades of his professional life trying to prevent people from going hungry. But in all those years, something beyond his control has crept into the work, slowly growing like the heat. Now, he’s battling another hunger crisis. In four counties of northern Kenya...

9.  US Firms Secure 19 Deals to Export Liquified Natural Gas, Driven in Part by the War in Ukraine  

2022-06-09


Inside Climate News
View In: German Energy Policy
War has been good for U.S. companies that liquefy natural gas and send it overseas in giant, ocean-going vessels, raising the possibility of a significant climate liability, according to an environmental nonprofit that’s been tracking LNG trends across the country. Since the Russian invasion of Ukrain...

10.  Inside Clean Energy: Flow Batteries Could Be a Big Part of Our Energy Storage Future. So What’s a Flow Battery?  

2022-05-19


Inside Climate News
View In: Climate Change solutions
A clean energy development this week in the San Diego area isn’t much to look at. Workers will deliver four white shipping containers that house battery storage systems. Soon after, workers will hook up the containers so they can store electricity from a nearby solar array. The part that I care abou...

11.  Q&A: The Activist Investor Who Shook Up the Board at ExxonMobil, on How—or if—it Changed the Company  

2022-05-17


Inside Climate News
View In: Beyond Oil And Gas Alliance
A year ago this month, a small hedge fund won an unlikely victory against ExxonMobil, gaining support from a majority of the company’s shareholders to replace three of its directors, against management’s wishes. The fund, called Engine No. 1, had argued that Exxon was failing to plan for a transitio...

12.  In the Philippines, a Landmark Finding Moves Fossil Fuel Companies’ Climate Liability into the Realm of Human Rights  

2022-05-15


Inside Climate News
View In: Beyond Oil And Gas Alliance
When Typhoon Haiyan struck the Philippines in 2013, it made a direct hit on the hometown of Yeb Saño’s family. Saño,the country’s chief climate negotiator at the time, had to attend the United Nations climate change conference in Poland only days after the storm passed. As he addressed the other delegates...

13.  An Unprecedented Heatwave in India and Pakistan Is Putting the Lives of More Than a Billion People at Risk  

2022-05-07


Inside Climate News
View In: India heat and drought
KARACHI, Pakistan–More than 25 people have suffered heat-related deaths in the state of Maharashtra in India since the beginning of an unprecedented heatwave in the subcontinent that has put the lives of over a billion people at risk.  For the past two months people in India and Pakistan have experience...

14.  ‘Stripped of Everything,’ Survivors of Colorado’s Most Destructive Fire Face Slow Recoveries and a Growing Climate Threat  

2022-05-06


Inside Climate News
View In: Colorado Wildfire
Four months after a Christmas-week wildfire ravaged their neighborhoods, destroying more than 1,000 homes near Boulder, Colorado, survivors are navigating post-traumatic stress disorder, dizzying bureaucracy and the prospect of a new normal for wildfire season. The Marshall Fire, Colorado’s most destructiv...

15.  New Reports Show Forests Need Far More Funding to Help the Climate, and Even Then, They Can’t Do It All  

2022-05-04


Inside Climate News
View In: Forests
As government leaders and forestry experts gathered in South Korea this week to discuss the state of the world’s forests, new research suggests that ambitious international efforts to curb deforestation are making insufficient progress and the planet’s trees continue to disappear. On Wednesday, an internationa...

16.  A Climate-Driven Decline of Tiny Dryland Lichens Could Have Big Global Impacts  

2022-05-02


Inside Climate News
View In: Global Heat and Drought
Lichens that help hold together soil crusts in arid lands around the world are dying off as the climate warms, new research shows. That would lead deserts to expand and also would affect areas far from the drylands, as crumbling crusts fill winds with dust that can speed snowmelt and increase the incidenc...

17.  The Current Rate of Ocean Warming Could Bring the Greatest Extinction of Sealife in 250 Million Years  

2022-04-28


Inside Climate News
View In: Biodiversity and Climate Change
If greenhouse gas pollution remains unchecked, global warming could trigger the most catastrophic extinction of ocean species since the end of the Permian age, about 250 million years ago, scientists warned in a new study today. During the end-Permian Extinction, researchers estimate up to 90 percen...

18.  California Regulators Banned Fracking Wastewater for Irrigation, but Allow Wastewater From Oil Drilling. Scientists Say There’s Little Difference  

2022-04-24


Inside Climate News
View In: California and Pollution
California prohibits farmers from growing crops with chemical-laced wastewater from fracking. Yet the state still allows them to use water produced by conventional oil drilling—a chemical soup that contains many of the same toxic compounds. When rumors spread several years ago that California was growin...

19.  Want to Elect Climate Champions? Here’s How to Tell Who’s Really Serious About Climate Change  

2022-04-21


Inside Climate News
View In: US Politics and Climate Change
For U.S. voters who care deeply about climate change, the 2022 elections are about more than control of Congress and leadership of most states. The results will, in a real sense, determine whether the U.S. can fulfill its pledge to be a leader in the drive to stave off the most catastrophic consequence...

20.  Climate Change Poses a Huge Threat to Railroads. Environmental Engineers Have Ideas for How to Combat That  

2022-04-08


Inside Climate News
View In: Miscellaneous Climate Change Articles
Much of the world still relies heavily on railroads to move people and products. But railway infrastructure—from overhead wires to tracks—is at high risk from climate change and associated extreme weather.  Without efforts to adapt to future climate threats, the railway industry will face degrading infrastructure...

21.  Complex Models Now Gauge the Impact of Climate Change on Global Food Production. The Results Are ‘Alarming’  

2022-03-27


Inside Climate News
View In: Food Prices
Inside dozens of bankers boxes, stacked high in a storage locker in New York City, Cynthia Rosenzweig has stashed the work of decades: Legal pads covered in blue-inked cursive with doodles in the margins, file folders marked “potato,” graph paper with notations of rainfall in Nebraska and Kansas. Rosenzwei...

22.  Germany’s New Government Had Big Plans on Climate, Then Russia Invaded Ukraine. What Happens Now?  

2022-03-25


Inside Climate News
View In: German Energy Policy
Vladmir Putin’s invasion of Ukraine has made Germany’s reliance on Russian oil and gas untenable, and led the center-left government of Chancellor Olav Scholz to accelerate the transition to clean energy. This is more than just talk. German leaders are in the early stages of showing the world what a...

23.  As Lake Powell Hits Landmark Low, Arizona Looks to a New Agency, a $1 Billion Investment and Mexican Seawater to Slake its Thirst  

2022-03-20


Inside Climate News
View In: Lake Powell and the Colorado River Basin
During his last year in office, Gov. Doug Ducey is trying to create a legacy of water security in drought-stricken Arizona. But his most ambitious effort in that quest could end up being in Mexico. In his last state of the state speech in January, he proposed an investment of $1.16 billion over the nex...

24.  Recent Megafire Smoke Columns Have Reached the Stratosphere, Threatening Earth’s Ozone Shield  

2022-03-17


Inside Climate News
View In: Global Heat and Drought
Scientists researching how the recent spike in extreme wildfires affects the climate say that just a few weeks of smoke surging high into the stratosphere from one intense fire can wipe out years of progress restoring Earth’s life-protecting ozone layer.  Close study of Australia’s intense Black Summe...

25.  California’s Climate Reputation Tarnished by Inaction and Oil Money  

2022-03-16


Inside Climate News
View In: California Energy
As California struggles to adapt to historic droughts and wildfires fueled by the climate crisis, state legislators are taking money from fossil fuel companies and dragging their feet on climate action, activists and members of a legislative climate caucus said during a press call Tuesday. California’...

26.  Coal Mining Emits More Super-Polluting Methane Than Venting and Flaring From Gas and Oil Wells, a New Study Finds  

2022-03-15


Inside Climate News
View In: Methane
Methane emissions from coal mines worldwide exceed those from the global oil or gas sectors and are significantly higher than prior estimates by the Environmental Protection Agency and the International Energy Agency, a new Global Energy Monitor report concludes. “The numbers just aren’t adding up,...

27.  As the US Rushes After the Minerals for the Energy Transition, a 150-Year-Old Law Allows Mining Companies Free Reign on Public Lands  

2022-03-13


Inside Climate News
View In: Arizona Mining
On the vast expanse of public lands across the West, a rush for the minerals needed for the 21st century technologies of the energy transition depends on a 150-year-old law. Those lands’ survival of the clean energy mineral rush may depend on rewriting it. A new open pit lithium mine was approved las...

28.  Is the Amazon Approaching a Tipping Point? A New Study Shows the Rainforest Growing Less Resilient  

2022-03-07


Inside Climate News
View In: Amazon Rain Forest
The world’s largest rainforest is losing its ability to bounce back from droughts and fires, pushing it farther toward a threshold where it could transform into arid savannah, releasing dangerous amounts of greenhouse gases in the process. A study published Monday in the journal Nature Climate Chang...

29.  Environmental Groups Are United In California Rooftop Solar Fight, with One Notable Exception  

2022-03-07


Inside Climate News
View In: California Energy
A policy debate over rooftop solar subsidies in California is pitting one of the largest environmental groups in the world, the Natural Resources Defense Council, against dozens of its peers in environmental advocacy. The NRDC has joined with utility companies to call for major cuts in rooftop sola...

30.  California’s Strict New Law Preventing Cruelty to Farm Animals Triggers Protests From Big U.S. Meat Producers  

2022-03-01


Inside Climate News
View In: California farming
Some have called it “Bacongate.” Republican Senator Chuck Grassley of Iowa calls it the “war on breakfast.”  California’s Prevention of Cruelty to Farm Animals Act, also known as Proposition 12, sets the strictest minimum confinement standards in the nation to ensure the humane treatment of farm animals...

31.  ‘Delay is Death,’ said UN Chief António Guterres of the New IPCC Report Showing Climate Impacts Are Outpacing Adaptation Efforts  

2022-02-28


Inside Climate News
View In: IPCC
Today’s report on climate impacts, vulnerabilities and adaptation from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change was finalized just as Russia invaded Ukraine. Russian scientists at the online approval session Sunday apologized for their country’s invasion, while the war drew Ukrainian scientist...

32.  Why Did California Regulators Choose a Firm with Ties to Chevron to Study Irrigating Crops with Oil Wastewater?  

2022-02-27


Inside Climate News
View In: California and Pollution
In 2015, a California water board suddenly found itself under a microscope for allowing farmers to irrigate their crops with oil field wastewater, a practice it had condoned for decades. The California Council on Science and Technology had just revealed that the testing and treatment of hazardous chemical...

33.  Chernobyl Is Not the Only Nuclear Threat Russia’s Invasion Has Sparked in Ukraine  

2022-02-26


Inside Climate News
View In: Possible Nuclear War in Ukraine
It took only hours for the Russian invasion of Ukraine to hang a nuclear threat over Europe. But the defunct Chernobyl power plant may pose less of a hazard than the forest surrounding it, or the 15 nuclear reactors still operating in the country. On Thursday morning, Ukrainian officials reported a fierc...

34.  How Greenhouse Gases Released by the Oil and Gas Industry Far Exceed What Regulators Think They Know  

2022-02-24


Inside Climate News
View In: Methane
Gaslit: First in a four-part series by the Howard Center for Investigative Journalism at Arizona State’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication about the flaring and venting of natural gas by oil and gas companies in more than a dozen states across the country. AUSTIN, Texas—Wayn...

35.  Global Wildfire Activity to Surge in Coming Years  

2022-02-23


Inside Climate News
View In: WildFires
As global warming heats the air and land, drying out trees and other plants, people around the world need to reset their expectations of where, when and how long wildfires will burn, warns a new global wildfire report released today. In a sweeping look, the scientists who authored the report for th...

36.  A Big Climate Warning from One of the Gulf of Maine’s Smallest Marine Creatures  

2022-02-20


Inside Climate News
View In: Biodiversity and Climate Change
 Given the rate at which the waters in the Gulf of Maine are heating up, Mainers may need to swap out the lobsters on their license plates for squid. All of New England could issue new specialty plates featuring creatures threatened by the speed climate change is slamming the gulf: a critically endangere...

37.  Inside Clean Energy: Recycling Solar Panels Is a Big Challenge, but Here’s Some Recent Progress  

2022-02-10


Inside Climate News
View In: Solar Power
German researchers said this week that they have taken silicon from discarded solar panels and recycled it for use in new ones. This is a positive step for dealing with the coming mountain of waste from solar power, but it’s just one part of dealing with a complicated challenge. The Fraunhofer Cente...

38.  To Counter Global Warming, Focus Far More on Methane, a New Study Recommends  

2022-02-09


Inside Climate News
View In: Methane
The Environmental Protection Agency is drastically undervaluing the potency of methane as a greenhouse gas when the agency compares methane’s climate impact to that of carbon dioxide, a new study concludes.  The EPA’s climate accounting for methane is “arbitrary and unjustified” and three times too lo...

39.  A California Water Board Assures the Public that Oil Wastewater Is Safe for Irrigation, But Experts Say the Evidence Is Scant  

2022-02-06


Inside Climate News
View In: California Water
After years of controversy, the Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board assured the public in the fall that eating California crops grown with oil field wastewater “creates no identifiable increased health risks,” based on studies commissioned as part of an extensive Food Safety Project...

40.  The Biden Administration Rethinks its Approach to Drilling on Public Lands in Alaska, Soliciting Further Review  

2022-02-04


Inside Climate News
View In: Biden On Climate
The Biden administration will give the public a new opportunity to weigh in on a major oil project proposed in the Alaskan Arctic, handing a victory to environmental groups that have opposed the development. In an announcement late Thursday, the Bureau of Land Management said it would solicit comment...

41.  Overwhelmed by Solar Projects, the Nation’s Largest Grid Operator Seeks a Two-Year Pause on Approvals  

2022-02-02


Inside Climate News
View In: Solar Power
The nation’s largest electric grid operator, PJM Interconnection, is so clogged with requests from energy developers seeking connections to its  regional transmission network in the eastern United States that it is proposing a two-year pause on reviewing more than 1,200 energy projects, most of the...

42.  Increased Flooding and Droughts Linked to Climate Change Have Sent Crop Insurance Payouts Skyrocketing  

2022-01-28


Inside Climate News
View In: Climate Change and Farming
As climate change drives more droughts, rain and extreme weather across American farmland, the cost of insuring the country’s farmers has soared, putting taxpayers increasingly on the hook for the growing tab. A new analysis based on government data finds that insurance payments to farmers have rise...

43.  ConocoPhillips’ Plan for Extracting Half-a-Billion Barrels of Crude in Alaska’s Fragile Arctic Presents a Defining Moment for Joe Biden  

2022-01-23


Inside Climate News
View In: Biden On Climate
The Biden administration is facing a major test for its climate agenda in the Alaskan Arctic, where an oil company is proposing a 30-year development that would pump more than half-a-billion barrels of petroleum from a fragile and rapidly-warming ecosystem. Climate advocates say the Willow project, planne...

44.  Florida’s Red Tides Are Getting Worse and May Be Hard to Control Because of Climate Change  

2022-01-19


Inside Climate News
View In: Extreme Weather
A task force appointed by Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis to address the state’s algal bloom crisis concluded in a recent report that “without hard work and careful planning” adverse human health impacts and widespread wildlife mortality would most likely “worsen” because of climate change and the state’...

45.  The U.S. Military Emits More Carbon Dioxide Into the Atmosphere Than Entire Countries Like Denmark or Portugal  

2022-01-18


Inside Climate News
View In: Climate Change and the Military
This story originally appeared on the War Horse.  In the fall of 2018, Neta C. Crawford, a political science professor at Boston University, prepared to teach a class on climate change designed to help students think about the issue in a big-picture way. Crawford’s research expertise is in war, so sh...

46.  Last Year’s Overall Climate Was Shaped by Warming-Driven Heat Extremes Around the Globe  

2022-01-14


Inside Climate News
View In: Extreme Weather
Earth’s annual average temperature checkup can mask a lot of the details of the climate record over the previous year, and 2021 showed that deadly heat-related climate extremes happen, even if it’s not a record-warm year. Global average temperature isn’t always the most important measure, Universit...

47.  Amid Delayed Action and White House Staff Resignations, Activists Wonder What’s Next for Biden’s Environmental Agenda  

2022-01-13


Inside Climate News
View In: Biden On Climate
The resignations of two key architects of President Joe Biden’s climate and environmental justice agenda in the last two weeks are raising concerns among activists, who have urged the administration to fulfill its promises to rapidly reduce carbon emissions and protect vulnerable communities. Cecili...

48.  Most Agribusinesses and Banks Involved With ‘Forest Risk’ Commodities Are Falling Down on Deforestation, Global Canopy Reports  

2022-01-13


Inside Climate News
View In: Carbon Lobby
Many of the world’s biggest banks, financial institutions and companies are not doing enough to stop deforestation, and in many cases are continuing to bankroll forest destruction, undermining efforts to stop a major driver of global carbon emissions, a new report has found. The report, released Thursda...

49.  On the Defensive a Year Ago, the American Petroleum Institute Is Back With Bravado  

2022-01-12


Inside Climate News
View In: Carbon Lobby
What a difference a year makes. The chief of the nation’s top oil and gas lobby laid out the state of his industry on Wednesday in a presentation that reflected a remarkable turnaround for the sector. A year ago, with President Joe Biden taking office and Democrats seizing control of Congress, the oi...

50.  Video: Aerial Detectives Dive Deep Into North Carolina’s Hog and Poultry Waste Problem  

2022-01-09


Inside Climate News
View In: Ecology
Conditions were optimal for an overflight on a bright, sunny November day in New Bern, a riverfront city that was North Carolina’s first state capital and the birthplace of Pepsi. Larry Baldwin and Rick Dover, his colleague at the Riverkeeper Alliance, an international nonprofit focused on clean water...

51.  Colorado’s Suburban Firestorm Shows the Threat of Climate-Driven Wildfires is Moving Into Unusual Seasons and Landscapes  

2022-01-07


Inside Climate News
View In: Colorado Wildfire
When he saw smoke in the air around Boulder, Colorado on Dec. 30, Tom Veblen walked up a trail near his home to check it out. Veblen, a professor emeritus of geography at the University of Colorado Boulder who has been studying forest ecology, wildfires and climate change since the mid-1970s, said h...

52.  Five Climate Moves by the Biden Administration You May Have Missed  

2022-01-01


Inside Climate News
View In: US Politics and Climate Change
President Joe Biden’s first year in office, which began with the launch of the most ambitious climate action plan of any administration, ended with its derailment due to harsh political reality. Up against a Senate that gives outsized power to members from sparsely populated states who are allied wit...

53.  After the Wars in Iraq, ‘Everything Living is Dying’  

2021-12-29


Inside Climate News
View In: Iraq
It’s 6 p.m. and the pink-tinged skies turn black above Agolan, a village on the outskirts of Erbil in the Kurdistan region of northern Iraq. Thick plumes of smoke have begun to billow out of dozens of flaring towers, part of an oil refinery owned by an Iraqi energy company called the KAR Group. The […]

54.  The Year in Climate Photos  

2021-12-27


Inside Climate News
View In: Year 2021
JANUARY President Biden Rejoins Paris Agreement and Kills Keystone XL on Day 1 of His Administration Joe Biden, who ran on the most progressive and comprehensive climate plan of any presidential candidate in history, took the oath of office just before noon on Jan. 20 outside a Capitol building tha...

55.  Coal Powered the Industrial Revolution. It Left Behind an ‘Absolutely Massive’ Environmental Catastrophe  

2021-12-12


Inside Climate News
View In: Carbon Lobby
HAROLD, Ky.—Along the winding, two lane road that leads to Tracy Neece’s mountain, there’s no hint of the huge scars in the hills beyond the oaks and the pines.   Green forests cover steep slopes on each side of the road, which turns from blacktop to dusty gravel. Modest homes are nestled into the bottomland...

56.  Nuclear Fusion: Why the Race to Harness the Power of the Sun Just Sped Up  

2021-12-08


Inside Climate News
View In: Climate Change solutions
A nervous excitement hangs in the air. Half a dozen scientists sit behind computer screens, flicking between panels as they make last-minute checks. “Go and make the gun dangerous,” one of them tells a technician, who slips into an adjacent chamber. A low beep sounds. “Ready,” says the person runnin...

57.  A Plea to Make Widespread Environmental Damage an International Crime Takes Center Stage at The Hague  

2021-12-07


Inside Climate News
View In: Chemicals
The campaign to make ecocide an international crime took center stage in the Hague on Tuesday as Bangladesh, Samoa and Vanuatu advocated criminalizing environmental destruction during a virtual forum at the annual meeting of the International Criminal Court’s 123 member nations.  The forum, attende...

58.  Fossil Fuel Companies Stand to Make Billions From Tax Break in Democrats’ Build Back Better Bill  

2021-12-01


Inside Climate News
View In: Build Back better Bill
With the Senate turning its attention to President Joe Biden’s climate and social policy bill in the coming weeks, lawmakers are poised to expand a key tax credit that energy industry lobbyists and some experts say could unleash an important climate tool. But the legislation, which includes changes t...

59.  The Clean Energy Transition Enters Hyperdrive  

2021-11-25


Inside Climate News
View In: Clean Energy
After decades in which governments and industry groups have often assumed that the shift to renewable energy will be a financial burden, economists and analysts are increasingly making a case that the opposite is true: The transition will lead to cost-savings on a massive scale that will add to its momentum...

60.  Concerns Linger Over a Secretive Texas Company That Owns the Largest Share of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline  

2021-11-22


Inside Climate News
View In: Permafrost
Environmental organizations and pipeline experts continue expressing concerns about a secretive Texas petroleum company with a spotty safety record that acquired the largest share of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline last year as thawing permafrost and flooding linked to climate change threatened the massiv...

61.  This Next-Generation Nuclear Power Plant Is Pitched for Washington State. Can it ‘Change the World’?  

2021-11-15


Inside Climate News
View In: Nuclear Waste
Proponents say new, small reactors could play a critical role in reducing climate-warming greenhouse gases. Environmentalists aren’t sold, pointing to waste, safety and cost issues.

62.  In a Stark Letter, and In Person, Researchers Urge World Leaders at COP26 to Finally Act on Science  

2021-11-13


Inside Climate News
View In: COP26
GLASGOW—As COP26 delegates went into overtime Friday night, shaping the language of their final climate communiques into something all 197 countries could agree on, scientists from around the world issued their latest, and perhaps starkest warning.  “We, climate scientists, stress that immediate, strong...

63.  Plans To Dig the Biggest Lithium Mine in the US Face Mounting Opposition  

2021-11-07


Inside Climate News
View In: Clean Energy
HUMBOLDT COUNTY, Nevada—Deep below the tangled roots of the old-growth sagebrush of Thacker Pass, in an extinct super-volcano, lies one of the world’s largest deposits of lithium—a key element for the transition to clean energy. But above ground, a cluster of tents has risen in the Northern Nevada deser...

64.  Big Oil’s Top Executives Strike a Common Theme in Testimony on Capitol Hill: It Never Happened  

2021-10-29


Inside Climate News
View In: Climate Change Propoganda
In testimony before Congress Thursday, top executives from some of the world’s largest oil and gas companies insisted that their firms had never misled the public about the science or severity of climate change. It was the first time the executives have been confronted while under oath with the industry’...

65.  Q&A: A Republican Congressman Hopes to Spread a New GOP Engagement on Climate from Washington, D.C. to Glasgow  

2021-10-29


Inside Climate News
View In: US Politics and Climate Change
The founder of a new Conservative Climate Caucus is part of a Republican delegation headed to the international climate talks in Glasgow next week. Rep. John Curtis (R-Utah) said his party should have a seat at the table when climate change is being discussed at home and abroad. Republicans, includin...

68.  The Rate of Global Warming During Next 25 Years Could Be Double What it Was in the Previous 50, a Renowned Climate Scientist Warns  

2021-09-17


Inside Climate News
View In: Miscellaneous Climate Change Articles
James Hansen, a climate scientist who shook Washington when he told Congress 33 years ago that human emissions of greenhouse gases were cooking the planet, is now warning that he expects the rate of global warming to double in the next 20 years. While still warning that it is carbon dioxide and methan...

69.  To Flee, or to Stay Until the End and Be Swallowed by the Sea  

2021-07-20


Inside Climate News
View In: Sea Level Rise
A beautiful but sad video about a sinking island in Louisiana, and the federal program to relocate the residents. Watch the houses on stilts.

70.  Thawing Permafrost has Damaged the Trans-Alaska Pipeline and Poses an Ongoing Threat  

2021-07-12


Inside Climate News
View In: Permafrost
Thawing permafrost threatens to undermine the supports holding up an elevated section of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline, jeopardizing the structural integrity of one of the world’s largest oil pipelines and raising the potential of an oil spill in a delicate and remote landscape where it would be extremely difficult to clean up. The slope of permafrost […]

71.  The Keystone XL Pipeline Is Dead, but TC Energy Still Owns Hundreds of Miles of Rights of Way  

2021-07-01


Inside Climate News
View In: Housing
When Richard Johnson heard that the Keystone XL pipeline had been canceled earlier this month, he felt a surge of relief. Johnson’s ranch lies directly on the pipeline’s planned route through the sandy plains of eastern Nebraska, and he had been tangling in court with the developer ever since the corporation used eminent domain to […]

73.  Is the Controlled Shrinking of Economies a Better Bet to Slow Climate Change Than Unproven Technologies?  

2021-06-18


Inside Climate News
View In: Climate Change and the Economy
Economic degrowth means to shrink the economies of rich, developed countries while maintaining the well being of the people and environment.

74.  The bankrupt Blackjewel Coal Mining Company can Walk Away from Cleaning up Abandoned Coal Mines  

2021-03-20


Inside Climate News
View In: capital
They can walk away form 30 permits now, and the rest in six months. No one goes to jail.

76.  Long-lost Core Drilled to Prepare Ice Sheet to Hide Nuclear Missiles Holds Clues About a Different Threat  

2021-03-15


Inside Climate News
View In: Climate History
Before the U.S. military tried to hide nuclear missiles under the Greenland Ice Sheet during the Cold War, they asked scientists to determine the stability of the ice that would shelter the warheads. From the secret nuclear-powered Project Iceworm base, a maze of ice tunnels and caves spanning nearly two miles, they drilled down more […]

78.  Extreme Heat Risks May Be Widely Underestimated and Sometimes Left Out of Major Climate Reports  

2021-05-16


Inside Climate News
View In: Extreme Weather
While scientists warn with increasing urgency that global warming is sharply increasing the likelihood of deadly heat waves, many regions are doing little to protect vulnerable populations. Recent research shows that the global death toll from extreme heat is rising, but still, “Large parts of society don’t think of heat as a threat,”